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K. Hughes
Sep 10, 2022
In Practical Learning Designs
After you have written your scripted lesson plan, do you then create a slide presentation to deliver your instruction? This course will surely offer you a practical learning design skills to instructional delivery while REDUCING your planning time! Apple Keynote is a great application that can simplify planning and your instructional delivery experience for learners in a sustainable way. Join this complimentary FREE course today to learn how to create a learning template using Keynote. What you learn in this course you can apply to any other presentation platform that you are comfortable using.
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K. Hughes
Sep 09, 2022
In Impactful Learning Solutions
With the beginning of the school year, how you structure your classroom will prove beneficial to you and your students in the long run. Sending the message that we are a thinking, learning and collaborative learning environment is paramount in fostering criticality and, what Dr. Gholdy Muhammad calls, intellectuality. While this week‘s resourse is an “online” resource feel free to use it as a ready made assessment for the implementation of discussion in our now hybrid-knowledge-attaining world. The use of discussion tencniques and intentional questioning engages students, checks for understanding, and builds rapport. Special Offer - Click Here!
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K. Hughes
Sep 07, 2022
In Impactful Learning Solutions
A 7th grade student walks into the classroom seven minutes late. She walks straight to the back of the classroom where her assigned seat is located in Ms. Mathew’s class. The student, Willow, takes her seat and removes her notebook and laptop from her backpack. She places these items on her desk; she looks at the board, and then puts her head down. Ms. Matthew’s, who is about to begin her mini lesson, walks over to Willow and says, “good morning Willow, if I were you I would get the Do Now complete as I am about to begin our mini lesson.” Willow, looks at her teacher and replies “okay Ms. M. I will get it done in a minute, I am not feeling like doing work today.” Ms. Matthew says okay and proceeds back to the front of the classroom. Willow is a ninety average student in Ms. Matthew’s class and is usually on time time to class. Willow also completes all of her assignments without little to no support from Ms. Matthews or her classmates. That day, Ms. Matthew, with her prior understanding of Williow’s performance in her class, does not engage Willow for the duriation of the class because she knows Willow will eventually “come around” and complete her missed classwork assignment. ________________ This is a common occurance in classrooms. A teacher‘s in-class decisions and pedagogical practices may illustrate low expectations that could yield poor results for class culture and student performance. Yes we ought to meet children where they are, but, I argue that in meeting students were they are, we must be clear about the expectations. Being clear will allieveate adverse feelings students may have if — for example— they are observing Williow and Ms. Matthew. As we know, it would not be long before another student is feeling like they don’t want to engage in the learning activities and uses the circumstance involving Willow to justify their actions. An educator’s pedagogical decisions and practices affect the achievement and well-being of their students. In this article, I share three ways a teacher’s low expectations (consciously or unconsciously) manifest in their pedagogical practices and in-class decisions. I also provide a few actionable steps that can be implemented tomorrow to begin the work of intentionally maintaining high expectations In your classroom. In my fifteen years of teaching middle and high school students, I admit I am guilty of a few of the ways I have idenified in this article. However, as I have progressed in my profession, I have done a better job in raising the bar and maintaining high expectations for all my students. Gentrup et al. (2020) argued that a teacher's low achievement expectations could result in a self-fulfilling prophecy. Furthermore, low expectations can hamper students' learning, whereas high expectations can foster students' learning and eventually lead to higher achievement gains. Moreover, it has been researched repeatedly and proven that a teacher’s achievement expectations can affect a student’s academic and socio-emotional development and can contribute to educational inequalities (Gentrup & Rjosk, 2018; Muntoni & Retelsdorf, 2018, Hughes, 2022). Teachers manifest low expectations based on their mental models about an array of factors aligned to their educational philosophy and whom they elect to teach. Our mental models are rooted in biases (Steele, 2011; Banaji, 2013). Reflection supports in “checking” those biases so that we are able to create action steps to change those beliefs that ultimately trigger our biased actions. For teachers of students like Willow, here are three ways you are messaging to your students that your academic and behavioral expectations of them are low through your pedagogical practices and in-class decisions. Click here to continue reading . . .
How Low Expectations Manifest in a Teacher’s Pedagological Practice and In-class Decisions content media
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K. Hughes
Feb 12, 2022
In Impactful Learning Solutions
Instructional design strategies that can be used when an instructor must move learning from face-to-face to online instruction includes: Designing materials using principles of cognitive load theory. Secret et al. (2019) argued that "helping students distinguish essential from less-essential information begins with the selection of the course's resources” (p.461). Designing activities that incorporate student engagement through interactive experiences; Secret et al. (2019) mentioned that "collaborative learning has a long history in instructional design [. . .] the benefits of collaborative learning include increased cognitive motivation, academic achievement, critical thinking, and openness to diversity" (p.462). Furthermore, interactive and thoughtful discussions foster critical reflection on course materials (Stauss et al., 2018,p. 494). Implementing ongoing formative assessment, continuous assessment, and feedback from the instructor and peers ensure students accurately absorb the domain-relevant content (Secret et al., 2019; Stauss et al., 2018). Supporting students in retaining information in long-term memory by providing scaffolding or foundational knowledge that students can quickly recall and easily transfer. This strategy helps students develop sustainable knowledge (Secret et al., 2019, p. 469). Creating activities and tasks that support the application of material under study to real-world settings. This strategy encourages students to use information in new situations (Secret et al., 2019). What is the real difference in instructional design when transitioning from face-to face learning to online learning? The instructional design differs in transitioning from face-to-face to online learning in that the use of technology is imperative. For instance, ensuring that students engage collaboratively online requires using cloud computing or video conferencing platforms. Stauss et al. (2018) argued that age considerations must be made when transitioning learning from a face-to-face to an online. "Studies found that younger students with less practice experience had some difficulty with e-learning that more seasoned students" (p.494). Additionally, the syllabus would be different in that it would include the technology that the instructor would use, technology and academic support services available to students, and include information about accessibility and usability within the online course platform (Quality Matters, 2021). Review the #cheatsheet that I have created from Secret et al.’s (2019) article. What are the high leverage teaching practices that align with the Culturally Responsive-Sustaining Education principles? How would you enhance some of the teaching practices to be more aligned with the Culturally Responsive-Sustaining Education principles? Resources Secret, M., Ward, C. J., & Newmark, A. (2019). Converting a face-to-face introductory research methods course to an online format: Pedagogical issues and technological tools. Journal of Teaching in Social Work, 39(4-5), 455-476. https://doi.org/10.1080/08841233.2019.1635558 Stauss, K., Koh, E., & Collie, M. (2018). Comparing the effectiveness of an online human diversity course to face-to-face instruction. Journal of Social Work Education, 54(3), 492-505. https://doi.org/10.1080/10437797.2018.1434432 Quality Matters. (2021). Quality Matters. https://www.qualitymatters.org/qa-resources/rubric-standards/cpe-rubric
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K. Hughes
Feb 05, 2022
In Impactful Learning Solutions
Impact teaching and learning with six clear and actionable steps. The ASSURE instructional design model was tailored for teachers to impact teaching and learning by implementing six key steps that include the following: 1. Analyze learners 2. State standards and objectives 3. Select strategies, technology, media and materials 4. Utilize technology, media, and materials 5. Require learner participation 6. Evaluate and revise Scripted planning does not occur until steps 4 and 5. In this model it is noticeable that knowing your learners well takes center-stage in order to plan effective instruction to meet their needs and align to their learning styles. In analyzing this instructional design model, it is important to understand that there are many strategic decisions that teachers are required to make in the planning process, as evidenced in steps 1 to 3, before actually scripting their lesson plan. This instructional design model can be used to plan lessons that are aligned with the Culturally Responsive and Sustaining Education framework because its attention on the learners. While there are elements of behaviorist ideology, step 5 supports learner engagement which can be illustrated in many ways that align more with constructivism — which centers on learners constructing knowledge independently and collaboratively. Download the ASSURE #cheatsheet to add to your teacher toolbox.
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K. Hughes
Jan 31, 2022
In Impactful Learning Solutions
There is a misconception that every child needs a scaffold in a classroom of diverse learners. The reality is that academic and intellectual diversity DOES NOT only include students who are far below or below standards for the subject in which one teaches. Therefore, it is critical to know your students well so that you can identify and create learning materials that meet their needs. Exemplars are wonderful just as they are, however, if you annotate your exemplars with your class or offer it as a resource for students (who may benefit from it), it will add to the effectiveness of your lesson. You can use annotated exemplars to enhance turn and talk, support peer/self revisions and/or assessment, and support in writing structure - just to name a few. The exemplar alone can work wonders as a model to demonstrate what is expected. However, providing an annotated exemplar as scaffold to support diverse students based on the teacher’s knowledge of the students will enhance learning outcomes based on the learning objective. Tech used: I used my iPad Pro. I took a screen shot of my exemplar and then coded the exemplar using my ✏️Notes app. Once complete, I took another screenshot and then added the image to my lesson plan. You could also use Microsoft Word as you can use the draw feature to do the same actions illustrated in the images below.
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K. Hughes
Jan 28, 2022
In Impactful Learning Solutions
Teaching and instruction are two distinct concepts. Instruction is an intentional process that requires an instructor or teacher to implement said process. This process, when designed and implemented appropriately, results in learning. The most effective learning environments are those that are problem-based and involve the student in four distinct phrases of learning. According to Merrill (2001) those phrases include: Activation of prior experience Demonstration of skills Application of skills Integration of these skills into real-world activities Check out my #cheatsheet from M. D. Merrill‘s article “First Principles of Instruction.”
What are the Four (4) Phrases of Effective Instruction? content media
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K. Hughes
Jan 10, 2022
In Practical Learning Designs
The five Principles of Instruction that promote learning are as follows: Learners are engaged in solving-real world problems. These problems should be relevant, interesting, and engaging;They must progress from less complex to more complex. Existing knowledge is activated as a foundation for new knowledge. Yes relevant experiences is the foundation for preparation to learn new knowledge. Help learners make connections. New knowledge is demonstrated to the learner. While this principle is easy, how information is presented to the learner is just as important. New knowledge is applied by the learner through the design/implementation of authentic situations. Executting this principle requires the instructor/teacher to provide clear, relevant and actionable feedback New knowledge is integrated into the learner’s world. This is where transfer happen. How will your learners demonstarte or apply what they learned outside the learning environment in which they learned it? These principles can be implemented using different delivery/ teaching methods to create effective learning environments. Bonus 🤔 Which one of the five principles of instruction is missing from this sample video? Which of the five princples of instruction do you find easy to implement? Which one do you find most challenging?
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K. Hughes
Jan 09, 2022
In Impactful Learning Solutions
Google Forms are a great way to gather information about your learners from your learners. Qualitative and quantitative data can be gathered from your learners to enhance the instructional choices you make to ensure that learning objectives are met. From interest surveys to end of course reflections, using a Google Form is one way an instructor or teacher can integrate technology into their planned learning experiences. Below are a number of ways I have utilized Google Forms to enhance learning and learner accountability for adolescent and adult learners. Adolescent Learners: Interest Survey Exit ticket Content and process reflection assignments Homework and enrichment assignments Asynchronous check-ins Assessment Unit evaluation Generating Google Documents from a form to support linguistic and neurodiverse learners Adult Learners: Unload end-of-training deliverable or artifact Interest Survey raining evaluation Peer Review of Professional Artifacts New Program launch reflection Generating ”running” documents Bonus: How do you use Google Forms to integrate the use of technology into your everyday instruction? Join the discussion.
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